Conference Chair Contact Information and Bios

For questions about TCR, the application process, or a specific track, contact both Brennan and Julie. For questions about event logistics, send a message to Brian (his assistant’s email is associated with his bio).

BRENNAN DAVIS

CAL POLY IN SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA USA

Brennan Davis (BDavis39@calpoly.edu) is Associate Professor of Marketing at the Orfalea College of Business at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, CA. He has a PhD in marketing from The Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California Irvine and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Brennan investigates theory about place, social psychology and unhealthy consumption. He won the 2016 Emerging Scholar Award from the Marketing & Society Special Interest Group of the American Marketing Association. He has publications in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing where his paper won the 2014 Kinnear/JPP&M Award from the American Marketing Association, and in the American Journal of Public Health where he won the best paper award in 2009 from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He has also published in the Journal of Business Research and has working papers targeting other top academic marketing and consumer research journals. He serves on the TCR advisory committee.

JULIE L. OZANNE

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE IN AUSTRALIA

Julie L. Ozanne is the Professor of Marketing at the University of Melbourne. Julie is a transformative consumer researcher who specializes in alternative methodologies for the study of social problems, such as interpretive, critical, participatory, and community action research methods. She also examines the problems of the poor and the low literate, as well as new forms of sustainable exchange based on sharing. Her scholarship has appeared in the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Business Research, and Journal of Marketing Management, among other outlets. In 2006 she was named the Ferber award winner at the Journal of Consumer Research (for best article based on a dissertation for which she was the head advisor). She was also recognized as the best reviewer of 2007 at the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. She is an associate editor at the Journal of Consumer Research, and on the editorial review board of Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, AMS Review, Consumption, Markets, and Culture, and Journal of Marketing Management. She is the chair of the TCR advisory committee (2013-15), co-edited the book–Transformative Consumer Research for Personal and Collective Well-Being (2012), co-chaired the 2009 TCR conference, and was a keynote speaker for the 2011 and 2013 TCR conference.

BRIAN WANSINK

CORNELL UNIVERSITY IN ITHACA, NY USA

Brian Wansink (Ph.D. Stanford 1990), recent Executive Director of the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (2007-2009) is an internationally known author and expert on eating behavior. Dr. Wansink holds the John S. Dyson Endowed Chair in the Applied Economics and Management Department at Cornell University where he is Director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. Previously, he was a professor at Dartmouth College, the Vrije Universiteit (The Netherlands), the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, INSEAD (France), and he was a visiting scientist at the U.S. Army Research Labs in Natick, MA. He was ABC World News Person of the Week January 4, 2008.

He is a Fulbright Senior Specialist in food marketing and nutrition, and in addition to writing Mindless Eating (2006), he is author of the books Marketing Nutrition (2005), Asking Questions (2004), and Consumer Panels (2002). His award-winning academic research on food has been published in the world’s top marketing, medical, and nutrition journals. It has been presented, translated, reported, and featured in television documentaries on every continent but Antarctica.

The research findings of he and his colleagues have also contributed to the introduction of smaller “100 calorie” packages (to prevent overeating), the use of taller glasses in some bars (to prevent the overpouring of alcohol), and the use of elaborate names and mouth-watering descriptions on some chain restaurant menus (to improve enjoyment of the food). His articles have appeared in the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Marketing & Public Policy and many others.